Category: Long Paddock

Long Paddock for Southerly 69.1: Animal

Where dwells the animal in Australian thought? The vast majority of that thought goes not to consideration of the species barrier, or to matters of animal cruelty and animal rights, but to the marketing of animal products. Yet certain Australians have been at the forefront of animal rights issues in recent times – Peter Singer, J. M Coetzee, David Malouf, A. D. Hope, J. S. Harry and others. This issue includes stimulating contributions from Dominic Hyde on Richard Sylvan and Val Plumwood, major figures in the critique of anthrocentrism; Helen Tiffin on Peter Goldsworthy; and essays by Yvonne Smith on…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 79.2: Writing Through Fences

The island continent has created an archipelago of incarceration spanning from South East Asia, Micronesia and Melanesia in the Pacific, the Indian Ocean and across mainland Australia. This issue of Southerly, titled Writing Through Fences, is devoted entirely to the work of past and present refugees in these detention centres. The records of their experiences are devastating; their creative responses, across genres and media, are astounding. The issue also includes responses from Australian writers, activists, essayists and students, who engage with refugee writing as well as the practices and consequences of refugee incarceration. Writing Through Fences is guest edited by…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 79.1: 80!

Southerly has turned 80! Founded in 1939, Southerly has been published continuously for fully four score years. This is a cause for great celebration; we salute the many, many writers whose poetry, fiction, essays and reviews Southerly has published, often providing new writers with their first foray into publication. In their submissions of work for this issue, many writers recall the significance of these first works, some dating from 50 and 60 years ago. Alongside literary stalwarts, and in keeping with Southerly’s committed practice, new writers reflect the matrices of contemporary Australia’s peoples and literatures. Juxtapositions of this kind are…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 78.3: Violence

In literary terms, violence provides a readymade drama, an impetus for action and reaction, shock, emotion, transformation—from Milton’s War in Heaven to Modernist aesthetics of shock to the contemporary thriller. Literature is also a site where violent experience is variously recorded, masked, performed and objectified. The work in this issue of Southerly is situated at the intersections where intense personal experience meets the force of pervasive operations including poverty, colonialism, gendered and racialised violence from the colonial period to the present. This issue also includes a range of unthemed material and reviews as well as the shortlisted and winning poems…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 78.2: The Lives of Others

Long Paddock The Lives of Others is concerned with the debts and obligations that accompany the passing of the generations. “For no one bears this life alone” is how Hölderlin describes the mutuality that binds us to our forebears. Each of the contributors to this issue of Southerly endeavours to understand the ways in which this mutuality guides out actions and behaviours. What forms of writing and memorialisation can assist us to acknowledge the unfinished nature of the relationships that link the present to the past, the living to the dead? Is there a way to answer the phantom’s call…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 78.1: Festschrift: David Brooks

This issue of Southerly pays tribute to David Brooks, who is retiring as editor after two decades’ stewardship. It includes poetry, fiction, essays and memoir that interweave readings of David’s work with accounts of the various literary communities that David has worked in over four decades from Canberra to North America, Perth, Slovenia, Sydney and now, Katoomba. Together, these pieces create a world of a very specific kind, one populated by words and word people and the currents between them in specific times and places. They also enable us to draw out recurrent themes and practices. The issue is a…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 77.3: Mixed Messages

The theme of this issue, Mixed Messages, relates in the main to a thread running through the essays, all of which engage with texts that challenge the limits of genre. These challenges include the status and influence of what might be termed a secondary genre deployed by writers whose renown is based on another form: Brigitta Olubas considers the short fiction of novelist Shirley Hazzard; and Cheryl Taylor introduces the poetry of novelist Thea Astley. Kate Livett delves into the mixed media, specifically music and photography, at the core of Helen Garner’s The Children’s Bach, and Peter Kirkpatrick examines the…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 74.1: Australian Dreams 1

A country where ‘it’s ok to be a bigot’. A country of refugees, refusing asylum. A country violating human rights, ignoring the pleas of the United Nations. A country ‘open for business’, with its trees, its coal, its uranium on the counter, its Reef and World Heritage areas on the line. How are your dreams of Australia going? Essays on the state of higher education, on ethnic minority, on the politics of fear; brilliant new work from major and emerging Australian writers; a troublesome feast of poetry, fiction, ideas and revelations, not all of them guaranteed to produce a good…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 74.3 Australian Dreams 2

ESSAYS AND MEMOIR Roberta Lowing, ‘After the Dream, the Awakening: 100 Years of Australian Celluloid Aspirations’ Donna Ward, ‘An Inch at a Time’ POETRY a.j. carruthers, ‘Axis’ Michael Farrell, ‘Some Problems With The Page As Terra Nullius’ Toby Fitch, ‘Villboard’ Mudrooroo Nyoongah, ‘Why Whatever Sadness’ FICTION Maureen Cashman, ‘The Amber Bird’ Michael Crane, ‘The Seven Days of Anna’ Melanie Kinsman, ‘Sucker’ Soren Tae Smith, ‘Wandjina’ REVIEWS Shaun Bell, of Kenneth Mackenzie, The Young Desire It Alison Broinowski, of Sheng Keyi, Death Fugue (trans. Shelly Bryant) Margaret Bradstock, of Sarah Day, Tempo and John Upton, Embracing the Razor Jessica Brooks, of Vanessa…

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Long Paddock for Southerly 70.2: Romance

Is Australian romance an oxymoron? It has been long thought so; not for us Don Juan or Don Quixote but Ned Kelly and Tom Collins. Even when romance rears its alluring head in Australian fiction, as with Harry’s wooing of Sybilla in My Brilliant Career, it is often quashed as a distraction or delusion. More recently, celebrated texts of their times such as Puberty Blues (1979), Oscar and Lucinda (1988), Praise (1992) have confirmed the view that romance is difficult in Australia – and in Australian fiction. If we have prided ourselves on taking the steely-eyed view without the filter…

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